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Enchiridion, or The Manual of Epictetus - Epictetus

... with alacrity, without having thought of the things which will follow; but afterwards, when certain base (ugly) things have shown themselves, you will be ashamed. A man wishes to conquer at the Olympic games. I also wish indeed, for it is a fine ...

If You Really Knew - Out Of Eden Play

... mind If you knew the God I know You would have the time If you take a chance, I know you will find Everything you need in love of another kind I, too, have been hurt by those who claimed to show the way ...

The Return of the Native (Chap. 3.6) - Thomas Hardy

... ?never attempting to mend matters at all. I was comparatively a young woman then, and I might have had another family by this time, and have been comforted by them for the failure of this one son." "It is more noble in you ...

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You Can't Hate the Roots of a Tree and Not Hate That Tree - Malcolm X

... , explosive ingredients, remain, then you're going to have the potential for explosion on your hands. Brothers and sisters, let me tell you, I spend my time out there in the street with people, all kind of people, listening to what ...

Chapter 14: War Is the Health of the State - Howard Zinn

... have the right to overthrow... . The war gave the government its opportunity to destroy the IWW. The IWW newspaper, the Industrial Worker, just before the declaration of war, wrote: "Capitalists of America, we will fight against you, not for you ...

On the Future of our Educational Institutions (Chap. 2) - Friedrich Nietzsche

... feeling for one's own tongue, is, in the case of German, never conducted with that fitting categorical strictness and dignity which would be above all necessary in dealing with an undisciplined language. Of late, exercises of this kind have tended ...

On the Future of our Educational Institutions (Chap. 4) - Friedrich Nietzsche

... whose works we hold up with feelings of pride for the admiration of foreign lands?how did they obtain the education you demand for them, to what degree do they show that they have been nourished and matured by basking ...

On the Genealogy of Morals, First Essay - Friedrich Nietzsche

... values, something whose like has never existed on earth?from that grew something just as incomparable, a new love, the deepest and most sublime of all the forms of love: ?from what other trunk could it have grown? . . . However, one should ...

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The Dawn of Day (Book II) - Friedrich Nietzsche

... , I should have suffered all kinds of agonies in the interval, lying awake all night, and at the decisive moment should also perhaps have fallen down like the man instead of helping him; for in the meantime all the imaginable cravings ...

The Dawn of Day (Book III) - Friedrich Nietzsche

... upon every kind of will and knowledge, this is what you men of the coming century will be proud of,?if the prophets of the commercial classes are right in putting that century into your possession! But I have little belief ...

On the Duty of Civil Disobedience - Henry David Thoreau

... they have. Governments show thus how successfully men can be imposed upon, even impose on themselves, for their own advantage. It is excellent, we must all allow. Yet this government never of itself furthered any enterprise, but by the alacrity ...

Thanks To The Gods - Akira The Don

... I had not the means That I was never put in that position myself Of having to take something from somebody else That I have the wife I do Obedient Loving Humble That my children had competent teachers For the remedies shown me in ...

On The Sufferings of The World - Arthur Schopenhauer

... by feeding upon itself. This it does by forming a gradation of phenomena, every one of which exists at the expense of another. I have shown, however, that the capacity for suffering is less in animals than in man. Any further explanation ...

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The History of the Peloponnesian War (Chap. 1.2) - Thucydides

... sense of the kindness. But if they cannot clearly establish any of these points, they must not be annoyed if they meet with a rebuff. Now the Corcyraeans believe that with their petition for assistance they can also give you a satisfactory ...

The History of the Peloponnesian War (Chap. 2.1) - Thucydides

... reminded by seeing in the homes of others blessings of which once you also boasted: for grief is felt not so much for the want of what we have never known, as for the loss of that to which we ...

The History of the Peloponnesian War (Chap. 2.2) - Thucydides

... as follows: "I was not unprepared for the indignation of which I have been the object, as I know its causes; and I have called an assembly for the purpose of reminding you upon certain points, and of protesting against your being unreasonably irritated ...

The History of the Peloponnesian War (Chap. 6.3) - Thucydides

... , plot always against you, never let slip an opportunity once offered, as they have shown in the case of the Leontines and others, and now have the face, just as if you were fools, to invite you to aid them ...

The Apology of Socrates - Plato

... , and what is the origin of these accusations of you: for there must have been something strange which you have been doing? All this great fame and talk about you would never have arisen if you had been like other ...

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Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals ( Chap. II ) - Immanuel Kant

... still shows that we really acknowledge the validity of the categorical imperative and permit ourselves (with all respect for it) only a few exceptions that, as it seems to us, are inconsiderable and wrung from us. We have therefore shown at ...

Of the Concept of an Object of Pure Practical Reason (Chap. 2.1) - Immanuel Kant

... supersensible objects to which reason might lead us, following the guidance of that law, have still no reality for us, except for the purpose of that law, and for the use of mere practical reason; and as reason is authorized ...

Of the Principles of Pure Practical Reason (Chap. 1.1) - Immanuel Kant

... he is free- a fact which but for the moral law he would never have known. FUNDAMENTAL LAW OF THE PURE PRACTICAL REASON Act so that the maxim of thy will can always at the same time hold good as a principle ...

Transition from popular moral philosophy to the metaphysic of morals - Immanuel Kant

... secure us from falling away altogether from our ideas of duty, or maintain in the soul a well-grounded respect for its law, but the clear conviction that although there should never have been actions which really sprang from such pure ...

Man the Reformer - Ralph Waldo Emerson

... of love and aspiration; but rather what he then puts out of sight, only showing the brilliant result, and atoning for the manner of acquiring, by the manner of expending it. I do not charge the merchant or the manufacturer. The ...

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The American Scholar - Ralph Waldo Emerson

... follow the moon. For this self-trust, the reason is deeper than can be fathomed, - darker than can be enlightened. I might not carry with me the feeling of my audience in stating my own belief. But I have already shown the ...

The Conduct of Life (Chap. 3) - Ralph Waldo Emerson

... out. An apple-tree is a stupid kind of creature, but if this treatment be pursued for a short time, I think it would begin to mistrust something. And if you should take out of the powerful class engaged in trade a hundred good ...

The Conduct of Life (Chap. 6) - Ralph Waldo Emerson

... you on the back, and congratulate you on your increased common sense. Our recent culture has been in natural science. We have learned the manners of the sun and of the moon, of the rivers and the rains, of the ...

The Conduct of Life (Chap. 8) - Ralph Waldo Emerson

... ." A Greek epigram intimates that the force of love is not shown by the courting of beauty, but when the like desire is inflamed for one who is ill-favored. And petulant old gentlemen, who have chanced to suffer some intolerable ...

The Method of Nature - Ralph Waldo Emerson

... to you the palace of Friendship, -- those purple skies and lovely waters the amphitheatre dressed and garnished only for the exchange of thought and love of the purest souls? It is that. All other meanings which base men have put ...

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The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin (Part Two) - Benjamin Franklin

... and your disinterestedness, without which you never could have waited for your advancement, or found your situation in the mean time comfortable; which is a strong lesson to show the poverty of glory and the importance of regulating our minds. If ...

Aeneid: Book 4 - Publius Vergilius Maro

... ever Dido, when you most were kind, Were pleasing in your eyes, or touch'd your mind; By these my pray'rs, if pray'rs may yet have place, Pity the fortunes of a falling race. For you I have provok'd a tyrant's hate ...

The Emptiness of Picture Galleries - Nathaniel Hawthorne

... might have been my peril once,? answered Hilda. ?It is not so now.? ?Yes, fair maiden, you stand in that peril now!? insisted the kind old man; and he added, smiling, yet in a melancholy vein, and with a German grotesqueness of ...

Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave Chapter 10 - Frederick Douglass

... said, "You devil! You yellow devil! it was you that put it into the heads of Henry and John to run away. But for you, you long-legged mulatto devil! Henry nor John would never have thought of such a thing ...

What to the Slave Is the Fourth of July? - Frederick Douglass

... . That is a branch of knowledge in which you feel, perhaps, a much deeper interest than your speaker. The causes which led to the separation of the colonies from the British crown have never lacked for a tongue. They have all been taught ...

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The History of Herodotus, Vol II (Chap. 1) - Herodotus

... desired to be free, and began to besiege the despots shut up in the Pelasgian wall. 65. And the Lacedemonians would never have captured the sons of Peisistratos at all; for they on their side had no design to make ...

The History of Herodotus, Vol II (Chap. 3) - Herodotus

... done: but that I may not seem to you to be following my own counsel alone, I propose the matter for discussion, bidding any one of you who desires it, declare his opinion." 9. Having thus spoken he ceased; and after him Mardonios ...

Chapter 5 - The Tale of the Porter and the Three Ladies of Baghdad - Richard F. Burton

... , quoth the porter to the askers, "And you, O brothers mine, have ye no story or rare adventure to amuse us withal?" Now the warmth of wine having mounted to their heads, they called for musical instruments, and the portress brought ...

Saint Augustine's “The City of God - Book I” - Dr. Tenen

... a par with the shortest. For of two things which have alike ceased to be, the one is not better, the other worse?the one greater, the other less.1 And of what consequence is it what kind of death puts an ...

Saint Augustine's “The City of God - Book XIV” - Dr. Tenen

... of the serpent; for love is susceptible of this fear, yea, love alone is capable of it. But the fear which is not in love is of that kind of which Paul himself says, ?For ye have not received the ...

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The Dragon and the Wolf - Game of Thrones

... will have been for nothing. The crown accepts your truce. Until the dead are defeated, they are the true enemy. JON: (SIGHS) CERSEI: In return, the King DAENERYS: Just the King CERSEI: (CHUCKLES) I would never ask it of you. You ...

The Rains of Castamere - Game of Thrones

... your age, I'd have broken fifty oaths to get into that without a second thought. Well, I've enough room in the hall for you lot. We'll set up tents outside with food and ale for the rest of your men. [ROBB ...

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